https://i1.wp.com/i.huffpost.com/gen/723369/thumbs/o-HOMELAND-SEASON-2-POSTER-570.jpg

 

From PC Mag:

“Definition of: Twittersphere

The total universe of Twitter users and their habits. Also called the “Twitosphere” and “Twitterverse,” statistics for the Twittersphere include data such as which days of the week have the heaviest Twitter traffic, and the approximate number of followers Twitter users have; for example, more than half have less than 25, while approximately 5% have more than 250. Other measurements of interest are how many people follow multiple tweets and how many tweet writers follow other tweet writers.

The term may also refer less globally; for example, to a personal Twittersphere (those who follow a particular tweet writer), to the Twittersphere of a country or to the Twittersphere of a group, club or other association. See Twitter and Twitterese.”

I have written previously that Twitter is a ‘star-fan medium’. It is used primarily as a means of conversation, or ‘chatter’ between professional and independent users about topics , or ‘threads’ of interest, usually connected to some current event. Most of the ‘tweets’ released into the world of Twitter by independent (non-star) users are links to some sort of news story, grabbed from the ‘attention-sphere’ that is a Google search, or article from a mainstream publication. The items are then re-pressed into the ‘Twittersphere’, with the news item now linked to the user who ‘tweeted’ the link, hopefully bringing attention to both the news, and him or herself.

There are two ways to ride an attention wave in the  Twittersphere : the Right Way, and the Wrong Way.

First, the Right Way. Let us first find an attention wave that has been ‘broken’ by a major publication, say, the New York Times. There are tons of things happening in the world, from continuing strife in war-torn Syria, to updates on the ‘war on drugs’ in Mexico. None of these waves involve the United States in an obvious way, however, so we will forego any attempts to ride them. We will look instead to some of the domestic news.

In the domestic news of the Times, we come across a workplace shooting, the latest in a number of random violence outbreaks stretching back to the 2012 summer. We decide that this particular wave ‘has legs’; it is something that people will be ‘chatting’ about, at least for the rest of the day, even though the event is actually pretty old.   In the Twittersphere, however, the event is still red-hot as evidenced by the large number of ‘tweets’ about it coming in:

 

Notice the number of tweets that are nothing more than links to some external website that has published the story?  Those links are ways that the ‘tweeters’ hope to bring attention to themselves, by making known to the Twittersphere events that they themselves find interesting. The problem is, however, that few of the links tweeted by these random individuals stand out.

When a popular attention wave occurs, there will be an equally-massive wave of activity in social media, as people share the news with people they know, and the public in general. That is well-and-good for the official news sites gaining free publicity through linking.  For an amateur tweeter to make sharing links worth something personally, his or her shared link must have a greater depth than the rest. It must have some personality. It must reflect one’s personal take vis-a-vis the event.

So, in the case of the ‘Shooting in Minneapolis’, instead of a generic link to the New York Times’ article on the event, an amateur tweeter might provide a link to an article about what insight certain Law Enforcement officers have in regards to workplace violence:

That is a much better approach to take when one wants to ‘ride a wave’ using Twitter as a medium for personal publicity. By merely making one’s tweet stand out amongst hundreds or thousands of similar-style linking tweets, it is more likely that the tweet will grab attention, and direct it to the individual. It could result in a number of new ‘followers’ (fans).

That is a much better approach to take when one wants to ‘ride a wave’ using Twitter as a medium for personal publicity. By merely making one’s tweet stand out amongst hundreds or thousands of similar-style linking tweets, it is more likely that the tweet will grab attention, and direct it to the individual. It could result in a number of new ‘followers’ (fans).

That is the right approach. Now for a look at the Wrong approach.

Some attention waves just don’t resonate. For reasons sometimes unknown, events happen in the attention-sphere, and nobody really cares. Such is the case with the wave of Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, veteran of the Persian Gulf, Iraq and Afghanistan, and charged with forcible sodomy, wrongful sexual conduct and other violations of military law, according to the Times. The second-to-latest tweet concerning Sinclair was published 3 hours ago, a search reveals. Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair’s attention wave is ice cold.

 

While one could be forgiven for thinking  that the ‘shock value’ provided by the sexual nature of the General’s crimes might drive interest in this wave, the search within the Twittersphere speaks to the contrary: nobody cares.

So we will search for any other ‘hot’ waves buzzing around the Twittersphere. Prompted by an article in the Times, we come across a piece on the hit tv show, ‘Homeland’. The Showtime Series has just recently won Emmy Awards for  Best Actor, Actress And Drama Series. With the debut of its 2nd season just around the corner – September 30 – there is a massive amount of chatter related to the drama on Twitter.

In other words, the ‘Homeland’ wave has potential. Even though I myself have not watched one second of the show thus far, this could change in the future. The show is young yet, and it is very easy to get caught-up by watching a DVD of the first season. In the meantime, however, I can attach myself to the wave of interest cresting around the Showtime drama, using the technique I discussed earlier in the ‘Minneapolis Shooting’ event.  I can provide a link related to the show that stands out from the rest by providing unique insight into the show for any one who is unfamiliar with it. If a general question a person might have about ‘Homeland’ is ‘what’s the big fuss about that show?’, then my link might answer that question.  In fact, I might provide a number of links that answer the question:

 

Three tweets attached to the ‘Homeland’ tv series wave. Three tweets that are more likely than most to garner attention for the tweeter, Billy Dagger. Sure, It is a cheap scam, but it doesn’t take much to ‘hook’ people, and attract followers with a link that piggybacks a topic trending on Twitter. It merely takes the will to do so, coupled with the savvy to do it effectively.

Using the Twittersphere as an attention-scamming medium is very new. But Twitter is almost guaranteed to  overtake Youtube as the primary medium for ‘star-making’ in the near future…….

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements